Book Lists

Slippery Anniversary

Slippery Anniversary

It’s been a year–a very, very rough year in many, many ways, since the explosion on the Deepwater Horizon oil rig in the Gulf of Mexico killed 11 men, injured 17 others, and resulted in millions of gallons of oil geysering into the sea over the course of a 3-month tragicomedy of corporate error and outrages. We’ve […]

Keir's Reading List: The Director's Cut
By February 22, 2011 8 Comments Read More →

Keir's Reading List: The Director's Cut

In last week’s REaD ALERT, I offered an update on my resolution to read more widely (or wildly) in 2011 and shared my shortlist–the books I plan to start with. Given my reviewing schedule, I may get no farther than that, although I hope to. If I do get farther, I’ll have no shortage of […]

What to Read at Work
By January 26, 2010 2 Comments Read More →

What to Read at Work

On the Guardian‘s Books Blog, Toby Lichtig bemoans bad weather’s effect on workday reading: when you can’t go outside at lunch, just where and how are you supposed to get any reading done? He also identifies five books not to read on your lunch break – because they bring with them “a horrible sense of deja vu”: […]

From Android Karenina to Huckleberry Fang
By January 17, 2010 14 Comments Read More →

From Android Karenina to Huckleberry Fang

And to think it all started with a plucky little mash-up called Pride and Prejudice and Zombies. In her review, Mary Ellen Quinn asked, with tongue firmly in cheek, “What’s next? Wuthering Heights and Werewolves?” Not a bad guess, but the next offering was actually Sense and Sensibility and Sea Monsters. Since the public’s appetite for good […]

Visions of Haiti Past
By January 14, 2010 0 Comments Read More →

Visions of Haiti Past

Many of us feel helpless in the face of catastrophes, especially one as devastating as the earthquake that hit Haiti Tuesday, January 12. We can make donations to humanitarian efforts, and we can channel our compassion by learning more about a place we perhaps know little about.  Stories help us connect with the “common humanity” President Obama reminds us of, […]

Let's Get Romantic
By October 30, 2009 1 Comments Read More →

Let's Get Romantic

I have a confession to make. I was among the many who thought romance novels were silly. Formulaic, pure fluff. Damsels in distress. Ladies in long dresses and painful bodices. Men in puffy shirts. Then I became Booklist‘s romance editor. I scrutinized the wonderfully varied array of romance novels that arrived in the mail. I attended a Romance Writers of America […]

True Confessions and Funny Books
By September 29, 2009 5 Comments Read More →

True Confessions and Funny Books

I have a confession to make: I read Parade. Every week, after I work my way through the Sunday paper, or what’s left of it, I turn to this slim little tabloid knowing that I’ve truly saved the best for last. No, I am not particularly interested in learning What America Earns, nor do I […]

Pre-Atomic Post-Apocalypse

Pre-Atomic Post-Apocalypse

Great list on Listverse: “15 Influential Early Works of Apocalyptic Fiction” (via American Libraries Direct). It’s somewhat similar to the “End of the World Literature List” from AbeBooks, with the distinction that THESE post-apocalyptic works were all written pre-Atomic Age; both lists include earlier works than my “Core Collection: Before and After The Road” (although I was the only […]

Comic Books

Comic Books

In the Boston Globe (“What’s so funny?“), Alex Beam discusses the challenge of writing the comic novel: In the immortal deathbed phrase variously attributed to actors Edwin Booth, Edmund Kean, Donald Wolfit, and others: “Dying is easy, comedy is hard.” Comedy on the printed page may be the hardest of all. Writer Roy Blount Jr. […]

The Wheel of Karma
By April 17, 2009 0 Comments Read More →

The Wheel of Karma

A post yesterday on Galleycat, about a bookstore‘s cancellation of Jayanti Tamm’s first public reading from Cartwheels in a Sari, made me think of a similar memoir, Kyria Abrahams’ I’m Perfect, You’re Doomed, which made me think of Kevin Roose’s The Unlikely Disciple–which, as luck would have it, was the subject of another recent Galleycat post. Coincidence–or […]