By September 28, 2009 0 Comments Read More →

Had a Condo Made of Stone-ah

king tut

James Patterson’s The Murder of King Tut: The Plot to Kill the Child King comes out today, and of course, you don’t have enough copies for your patrons. Or perhaps, when they’ve read it, their interest is piqued. Here are some more titles on the Boy King.

Fiction:

The Lord Mehren Series by Lynda S. Robinson.  The 6 titles in this series follows Lord Meren, a confidant of the Pharaoh Tutankhamun, as he solves crime in ancient Egypt.  Full of historical customs and facts.

The Egyptologist by Arthur Philips.  Set in the 1920s, Egyptologist Ralph Trilipush risks his career and his reputation searching for the tomb of an ancient pharaoh.

The Amelia Peabody Series by Elizabeth Peters.   Victorian spinster shakes off the mores of the day to travel to Egypt and become an archaeologist. Another series by Peters, featuring art historian Vicky Bliss, contains a novel where Bliss sets off to find the missing mummy of King Tut – The Laughter of Dead Kings.

Valley of the Kings: A Novel of Tutankhamun by Cecelia Holland.  A fictional account of Howard Carter’s discovery of Tutankhamen’s long-lost tomb.

Nonfiction:

The Mysterious Death of Tutankhamun by Paul Doherty.  Written like a best-selling thriller,  Doherty asks and answers questions surrounding Tut’s death and discovery.

Tutankhamun The Golden King and the Great Pharaohs by Zahi A. Hawass and Sandro Vannini. Written to commemorate the world museum tour of Tut’s tomb in 2008, this lavish book features photographs and illuminating commentary.

Who Killed King Tut?  Using Modern Forensics to Solve a 3,330-year-old Mystery by Michael R.King and Gregory M. Cooper ; with Don DeNevi. The authors speculate on who or what killed Tut, based on ancient history, modern forensic techniques, and archaeological evidence.

In the Valley of the Kings: Howard Carter and the Mystery of King Tutankhamun’s Tomb by Daniel Myerson.  A biography of Carter, the British archeologist who discovered the  tomb of the boy king Tut in 1922.

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About the Author:

Rebecca Vnuk is the editor for Reference and Collection Management here at Booklist. She is also the author of 3 reader’s-advisory nonfiction books: Read On…Women’s Fiction (2009), Women’s Fiction: A Guide to Reading Interests (2013) and Women’s Fiction Authors: A Research Guide (2009).

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