Archive for February, 2008

Ugly Awards
By February 22, 2008 3 Comments Read More →

Ugly Awards

Last Friday, Galleycat had a post (“Edgars vs. Nibbies“) about ugly literary awards…I don’t have anything to add other than that I was glad to see I wasn’t alone in disliking the Edgar statuette. (Which obviously doesn’t disparage the award itself–who wouldn’t love to win one?) And I agree completely: the Hugo is boss. I […]

Posted in: Awards, Likely Stories
Talk About Yourselves

Talk About Yourselves

Calling all book group people! (and you know who you are) We know you like to talk about books, but we want you to talk to us about your book group. Please help us get a picture of book groups across the country by participating in a short informal survey from the RUSA CODES Readers’ […]

Reading Resolutions, Reading Challenges
By February 21, 2008 0 Comments Read More →

Reading Resolutions, Reading Challenges

The librarians in my children’s department made reading resolutions this year and posted them on a bulletin board.  Mine was to read a chapter book with an animal main character each month.   The character must be a different kind of animal than any read about in the previous months.  So far, I’ve read about cats with […]

Wealthy Women, African Atrocities
By February 21, 2008 0 Comments Read More →

Wealthy Women, African Atrocities

 When I heard that a group of eight wealthy, married women in a prosperous North Seattle neighborhood were about to read for their book club Dave Eggers’ harrowing, gut-wrenching What is the What, I had misgivings. This wasn’t Anne Tyler or Amy Tan. This was a nearly 500-page saga about thousands of orphaned boys being […]

Confessions of a Groupie
By February 21, 2008 0 Comments Read More →

Confessions of a Groupie

I’m a groupie.  No, not that kind…I’m a book groupie. Right now, I’ve got the compulsion under control. I’m only doing three groups. If I’m sneaky and use some books in multiple groups, I can usually manage my schedule of groupie reading, review reading, and even the occasional (gasp!) non-required book that I pick out all for […]

I'm Too Depressed to Write a Headline for This
By February 20, 2008 0 Comments Read More →

I'm Too Depressed to Write a Headline for This

Poor James Patterson. His last book for young adults, Maximum Ride: Saving the World and Other Extreme Sports, only sold 192,000 copies. He doesn’t feel badly for himself, mind you–he feels badly for all the unfortunate youngsters who somehow didn’t get the opportunity to read his book. From the New York Times (“An Author Looks beyond […]

1001 Resolutions
By February 20, 2008 0 Comments Read More →

1001 Resolutions

When my old Marlboro College roommate, Caitlin, and her husband Ashley last came to visit, we ended up sitting on the couch for an hour poring over the pages of 1001 Books You Must Read Before You Die, tallying up our personal scores. We didn’t intend to geek out in this way. But when they […]

In the Shadow of the Gonzo Fist
By February 20, 2008 4 Comments Read More →

In the Shadow of the Gonzo Fist

I’m reading Thomas Kohnstamm’s Do Travel Writers Go to Hell? A Swashbuckling Tale of High Adventures, Questionable Ethics & Professional Hedonism (Three Rivers). Kohnstamm, bitten early by the travel bug, has an early-life crisis (at the time the book takes place, he’s still in his twenties), walks away from his job, and flies to Brazil to […]

The Big Disappointment
By February 18, 2008 2 Comments Read More →

The Big Disappointment

Don Carpenter’s Hard Rain Falling (Harcourt, Brace & World, 1966) The serendipity of discovering a book never ceases to amaze me.  All my life I have been networked to fans of crime fiction, but recently a man walked into my library who knew I had written Read ‘Em Their Writes.  He handed me this title […]

Two New Novels Blur Truth and Fiction
By February 17, 2008 0 Comments Read More →

Two New Novels Blur Truth and Fiction

How much imagination is allowed before a memoir turns into a novel? It’s a fine line between autobiography and autobiographical fiction. The year has started out with some fascinating riffs on realism, including two very unusual hybrid approaches to reality that make top-flight reading and would make fascinating group discussion pieces. Tetsuo Miura’s Shame in […]