Archive for July, 2007

Too Much of a Bad Thing

Too Much of a Bad Thing

So I’m almost done reading Andrea Barrett’s The Air We Breathe (Norton). And I’ve got a big complaint. That doesn’t have anything to do with the writing. The design is too busy. I’m not, obviously, a book designer. I know the difference between serif and sanserif, but that’s about it. When art department types starting […]

Posted in: Likely Stories
Tintin in the United Kingdom

Tintin in the United Kingdom

In London, a customer’s outrage has caused Borders to pull Tintin in the Congo from the children’s section of its UK stores. (That the customer was a human-rights lawyer is probably incidental.) From the Associated Press (“Borders stores in UK shelve Tintin book,” by Raphael G. Satter): David Enright, a London-based human-rights lawyer, was shopping at Borders with his […]

Posted in: Kidlit, Likely Stories, News
Crouching Potter, Hidden Author

Crouching Potter, Hidden Author

NPR had a somewhat entertaining story about fake Harry Potter books in China (“Rush on for Knockoff Harry Potter in China,” by Louisa Lim). Frankly, I suspect I might enjoy Harry Potter and the Leopard Walk Up to Dragon even more than Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows. But I’m hoping something got lost in […]

Posted in: Kidlit, Likely Stories, News
Insert Last Name, First Name Bit Here

Insert Last Name, First Name Bit Here

Whenever the role of James Bond is up for grabs, the tabs kill a small forest in speculation. When a new author is given the role of Ian Fleming — which, ironically, leads to a bit of forest-killing, too — there’s a lot less hype. Still, how much fun to learn that Sebastian Faulks (Human […]

I Mean, Totally, You Know?

I Mean, Totally, You Know?

What Spencer Morgan really wanted to ask Kristin Gore (Sammy’s House, 2007; Sammy’s Hill, 2004) about was her brother’s drug bust last week. But instead he heeded the publicist’s command. Fascinating, simply fascinating. From The New York Observer (“More Than You Ever Wanted to Know about Kristin Gore’s Writing Process“): How, with all of these, […]

Arac de Nyeko Wins the Caine

Arac de Nyeko Wins the Caine

Summer is a slow time for literary awards. Fortunately, yesterday brought the news that Ugandan writer Monica Arac de Nyeko has won the Caine Prize for African Writing for her short story, “Jambula Tree.” Called the “African Booker,” the Caine judges short stories in English by African writers and reflecting African sensibilities. Arac de Nyeko will receive a £10,000 cash award […]

Posted in: Awards, Likely Stories, News
His Last Words, However, He Composed in Advance

His Last Words, However, He Composed in Advance

In the New York Observer (“Kurt Vonnegut’s Final Interview(s)“), Leon Neyfakh asks who can lay claim to having had the last interview with Kurt Vonnegut. To the disappointment of the many who held Kurt Vonnegut in similar esteem, the writer was robbed of any significant last words when he lay unconscious after a sudden fall until his […]

The Dukes of Hazzard: Champions of Literacy?

The Dukes of Hazzard: Champions of Literacy?

Despite the Guardian‘s headline (“Has the novel been murdered by the mob?“) National Book Critics Circle president John Freeman isn’t pondering who killed the novel as much as he is pondering what killed the audience. The answer? Good TV shows. He makes some valid points, although it seems that only a few years ago, BookPeople ™ were always […]

Posted in: Likely Stories, News
The spirit is willing…

The spirit is willing…

…but the flesh is weak. I’m just not strong-minded enough to ignore this link. From the Barre Montpelier Times Argus (“Author to hold ‘clothing-optional’ book signing,” by Susan Allen): James Cunningham’s book signing at a Waitsfield book store on Tuesday night promises to be as unlikely as the topic of the book itself, “Nudity & […]

Posted in: Likely Stories, News
Booklist vs. the Tribune

Booklist vs. the Tribune

The Chicago Tribune’s Julia Keller offers this year’s thoughts on the Great American Novel (“The Great American Novel was written by:“). And chooses American Psycho, by Bret Easton Ellis. I’m thinking she was swayed by the fact that the word American is in the title. Last year, Bill Ott asked us to vote for the […]